Sharing Photos on Social Media

Photography has come a long way in a short period of time, thanks to the digital camera that now inhabits nearly every smartphone, tablet computer, or other device. This convenience has offered many new avenues for communication, notably via social media. But not all photos should be shared. Here are some practical tips for regulating photo-sharing on social media.

Always ask first. You always want to give people the expectation that their picture might be taken, whether it’s at a client event, work function, or some other circumstance. It gives people a chance to straighten their hair, apply makeup, or simply let you know that they’d rather not have their photo taken. Some people don’t mind having their photo taken, but would rather it not be shared. Police and officers of the court are often very discrete about being photographed with family and loved ones, so be mindful and respectful of that.

How does this promote my business? If you are taking these photos with the intention of sharing them on your various Social Media presences, be sure to ask yourself how this furthers your business. For example, depending on the client event, dozens or hundreds of photos could be taken. Sharing all of them, or even most of them, will likely flood the feeds of your followers and annoy them. Pick one photo that exemplifies that everyone had a great time at your event.

Spotlight local businesses and charities. It’s possible that you have a few local businesses among your clientele. Make it a regular feature to spotlight them in your social media posts. This demonstrates your involvement in the community and gives these businesses the incentive to send potential clients your way. Just drop them an email and let them know that you’d like to come in and snap a picture with them while buying lunch, shopping, or whatever the business may offer.

In some cases, it may also be appropriate to share your involvement with community events, school fundraisers, and other charity involvement you may have. Know your base, though; religious or political events always have the potential to alienate some potential or existing clients, even in a relatively “harmless” context.

Tagging people in photos. In most circumstances, I’d suggest avoiding this altogether. On Facebook, tagging can have the effect of sharing the photo automatically in the feed of the person you are tagging. It can create an awkward situation for the person being tagged. The better thing to do is to encourage people to tag themselves if they want. If you tag them in the comments section of the photo, as opposed to the photo itself, you can direct their attention to the photo without displaying it to their friends and followers.

Personal photos. Of course, you may be tempted to share your own family photos on a personal Facebook, or on Instagram. If your Broker/Dealer allows this, have at it! But, be mindful that not everyone wants to see you in your swimsuit this summer. Each of the social media outlets have different privacy settings that can allow you to regulate who sees what. If something is for just your family members or close friends, use those settings. Especially with something like Instagram, be mindful of who you allow access to your personal account.

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