Contact Strategies – Building an Effective Client Contact Campaign

How to develop and execute a powerful client communication strategy to maintain and grow your financial services practice.

How often are you in communication with your clients? Three or four times a year? What about prospects … do you contact them once or twice and that’s it? If so, you are not keeping up the kind of contact campaign you probably should be. Further, you could be missing out on client generation and income potential.

Clients don’t necessarily fire advisors only because of performance, but rather because the advisor never communicates with them.”

– Bill Hammer Jr., Principle Founder, Hammer Wealth Group

 

The benefits of continual contact include …

  • Maintaining Relationships
  • Generating Referrals

Which can lead to …

  • Client Generation

Which can lead to …

  • Sales Generation

Did you know that even a low volume contact campaign should include eight or more points of contact per year? And your ideal contact should be getting a higher volume contact campaign, which can include 80 or more points of contact annually. Sound impossible? It’s NOT! Sound too time consuming? It doesn’t have to be.

 

“Frequent communication is the key to building stronger relationships.” – Suzanne Muusers, Business Coach

 

The MarketingPro system was designed specifically to make ongoing campaigns not only possible, but simple, quick and effective. Keeping your communication constant and effective is key, but first you must determine whether or not your contacts are ideal

Who are your ideal contacts?

Let’s face it … there are hundreds of different types of clients, and each could require different communication messages and methods. Your goal must be to create a custom campaign specifically intended for your clients/contacts/prospects.

The type and frequency of your communications should vary according to whether or not a client or prospect is “ideal” for you. If you’re not yet sure who your ideal clients are, it might be a good idea to work on determining that, before you develop your communication campaign(s). If you need help, we recommend the books “The Brand Called YOU” and/or “The Personal Branding Phenomenon” – both written by Peter Montoya and available on Amazon.com.

 

“You can’t determine who your ideal client is if you don’t have a firm handle on what your business is and what it does best.” – Stephen Sheinbaum, Contributor, Entrepreneur Media

 

Step 1: Choose Your Contact

Divide your clients, prospects, professional referrals, friends and family into two categories …

Ideal Contacts

Ideal contacts are people who are (or who could become) ideal clients, as well as those who could refer you to ideal clients. Ideal clients are the optimum blend of demographics, psychographics, strategic value and revenue for your practice.

Non-Ideal Contacts

Accordingly, non-ideal contacts are people who are not currently and aren’t likely to become ideal clients, and those who could not refer you to ideal clients.

 

Step 2: Choose Your Messages & Frequency

First you must decide whether to invest the time and money to contact both ideal and non-ideal contacts equally. Ideal contacts may receive the high or moderate campaign contact amounts, and non-ideal contacts may receive the low campaign contact amounts … or nothing at all.

  • High Contact Campaign – 80+ Points Of Contact Each Year

o   Weekly Economic Update or Weekly Financial Article [52]

o   Monthly Newsletter (Lifestyle, Retirement, or Newsletter Postcard) [12]

o   Quarterly Economic Update [4]

o   Annual Economic Update

o   Birthday Card

o   Wedding Anniversary Card (If Applicable)

o   Client Anniversary / Appreciation Card

o   Holiday Greetings (Major Holidays at Minimum) [6]

o   Annual Review Reminder

o   Annual Review Follow-up/Thank You

o   Opportunistic Contact (Interesting Articles, Invitations, Notes)

  • Moderate Contact Campaign – 26+ Points Of Contact Each Year

o   Monthly Newsletter (Lifestyle, Retirement, or Newsletter Postcard) [12]

o   Quarterly Economic Update [4]

o   Birthday Card

o   Client Anniversary / Appreciation Card

o   Holiday Greetings (Major Holidays at Minimum) [6]

o   Annual Review Reminder

o   Annual Review Follow-up/Thank You

o   Opportunistic Contact (Interesting Articles, Invitations, Notes)

  • Low Contact Campaign – 8+ Points Of Contact Each Year

o   Quarterly Economic Update [4]

o   Birthday Card

o   Client Anniversary / Appreciation Card

o   Annual Review Reminder

o   Annual Review Follow-up/Thank You

o   Opportunistic Contact (Interesting Articles, Invitations, Notes)

Remember, the “touches” listed above are starting points. You should also, always, be reaching out to clients when major financial news breaks.

 

Step 3: Choose Your Delivery Method

The age, occupation and geographic location of your contact may factor into determining whether they prefer to receive their information through email or traditional (postal) mail. If you are unsure, or if you do not have a contact’s e-mail address, mail them a letter to find out.

These days, in most cases, you’ll want to email ongoing communications (monthly eNewsletters, weekly updates, annual review reminders, etc.). However, an honest-to-goodness greeting card (a real, physical card) is still in order for birthdays, anniversaries, and Holidays. Don’t skimp here.

 

A recent survey revealed that 72% of customers prefer email communication. [SOURCE: marketingsherpa.com]

 

Step 4: Keep it going.

Select your contact campaign and stick to it. Make a goal to keep at least the minimum points of contact for each campaign, and see the difference it makes within a year. Use the tools, resources, and technology available to you to create compelling campaigns that are easy to maintain. Keyword: AUTOMATE. MarketingPro (www.Marketing.Pro) is the industry’s best resource for total marketing automation and continual, fresh, professionally-crafted content – with built-in compliance review.

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