Posts Tagged ‘client relationships’

Four Ways to Strengthen Your Client Relationships

November 16, 2017


We’re all looking for ways to turn client relationships into a lifetime of mutually beneficial business. For some, it seems to come naturally. But best practices require conscientious effort from the naturals as well as the newbies. While by no means a comprehensive list, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Accentuate the Positive
While it may sound corny, maintaining a positive attitude is incredibly helpful. Imagine you’re going to see your insurance agent. When do you go see them? When you buy a policy, when you make changes, and most importantly when you need to take advantage of that insurance. Not all of these are good days, so knowing that your relationship is with a positive person who builds a real connection with you is helpful. The same thing works in reverse, so keep it positive.

Build and Share Knowledge
If this seems like another no-brainer, you’re probably already on the right track. You have to know what you’re talking about and convey it correctly. This is more than just what you’re offering. Keeping up to date will not only help you serve clients better, it will also provide ways to stay ahead of the curve, and anticipate their needs.

On the Spot
When a client calls or emails you, respond as soon as you can. Be someone they feel they can turn to anytime, and show them you value their business by providing prompt replies. Become a presence in your clients’ lives, not just a voice on the phone or a person who returns emails. Do you Skype? That can help, if an in-person meeting isn’t possible or convenient for them. Be present and helpful, whenever possible.

Give It Time
If you think about your closest friends and confidants – maybe your spouse or partner – your connection took time to reach the point of trust. The same is true of your professional relationships. The thing to keep foremost in your mind is that the good work that you do will be the bedrock those relationships are built upon. Be the person that you would want to have working for yourself and, with a little patience, you can build lifelong client relationships.



Which Greeting Cards Should You Be Sending?

October 18, 2017


The answer is more complicated than you might think. Timing, as they say, is everything.

Sometimes the answer is obvious. For example: is there anything more ubiquitous in polite, professional society than the birthday card? Thank You cards should be on your list, too, and welcoming a new client calls for a specific sort of thank you card. (You should be sending a card to those who made the introduction, as well.)

But which Winter Holiday cards should you send? Well, that depends largely on who your clients are and what they value. However, if I were to select one card above all others, it would be the Thanksgiving card. Thanksgiving is a widely celebrated* holiday, commonly seen as the beginning of the “Holiday Season” in the United States. While Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanza are also associated with the winter holiday season, they also create a crush of mail.

A Thanksgiving card has the potential of making a big impact. Your clients probably expect a Christmas card, but that card will typically arrive amid a flood of other cards from family, friends, and other professionals like you. A Thanksgiving card is a thoughtful gesture that may stand out more, and allows you to express your gratitude for their business, while wishing them well through the coming holiday season. Of course, sending a card at Thanksgiving doesn’t mean that you should skip the other holidays – it’s merely a strategy to foster a greater connection between you and your clients and contacts.

Sending a card at Thanksgiving doesn’t mean that you should skip the other holidays – it’s merely a strategy to foster a greater connection between you and your clients and contacts.

A card to celebrate the New Year is also in order. A “Happy New Year” card is another great opportunity – not only to observe the Holiday, but to let clients know that you’re honored to be working with them for another year. (Many also choose to use this card as a reminder to schedule an annual review.)

Consider grouping your contacts into three Winter Holiday campaigns. Your “A” clients should receive three Winter Holiday cards… a Thanksgiving card, a Happy New Year card, and a December card (Christmas, Seasons Greetings, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanza, etc.) Your “B” clients and prospective clients should receive a minimum of two Winter Holiday cards (Thanksgiving and Happy New Year, more if you’re able.) All other contacts should receive at least one card (but two is better). Select the occasion you feel is most appropriate.

Marketing.Pro offers beautiful full-color Winter Holiday cards for all these occasions (and more). Your Holiday cards can even be automated to send to the contacts you choose, on the dates you choose. Upload your contacts, select the design(s) you like best, and the system does the rest (sorting, stamping, sending.) You can even upload your own handwriting and signatures for a more personal touch.

What about eCards? Don’t. At least, not for the clients and contacts you value. eCards are largely deleted, while a physical greeting card is a tangible reminder that the relationship is one that you value. After all, if your relationship with a client isn’t worth the cost of some paper and a stamp, you have the wrong clients.

If your relationship with a client isn’t worth the cost of some paper and a stamp, you have the wrong clients.

Don’t be afraid to shake things up a bit with your holiday and greeting card practices! I recommend mixing it up each year with at least one unexpected card to ALL of your contacts. (An occasion like “Talk Like a Pirate Day” is a great example!) The cards you send should reflect the relationship that you want to have with your clients – an enduring and connected presence!

*Many Native American families do not celebrate Thanksgiving due to their cultural preferences. Some religions forego the celebration of certain holidays, including Thanksgiving. Know your clients and adjust your strategies to avoid making an error – be someone who serves the entire community.

Boundaries with Clients

August 3, 2016

Bride And Groom Celebrating With Guests At Reception

If you’re holding client appreciation events, it goes without saying that you’ll be inviting your clients. But how often should you invite clients to your own personal events? And how often should you accept invitations to their events? Are weddings, birthdays, and holiday gatherings an appropriate place to celebrate alongside your clients? You want to distinguish your time from client time. Chances are that many of your clients may feel awkward or out of place at an event you are sharing with your family and loved ones. The same goes for you attending their event.